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Our Monday hours are: 8:30am - 5:00pm

Frequently Asked Questions

Animal Eye Clinic of Waterloo Region image
What is a specialist veterinarian?
What is a veterinary ophthalmologist?
How can we find you?
Does your clinic provide other veterinary services?
How do I make an appointment?
How do I give eye drops? - need video
What type of services do you offer?
refer to page with list on it
Does my pet have to stay overnight?
Does my pet have to wear the e-collar all the time?
How do I get more medications?
How can I find more information about my pet's eye problems?
 
What is a specialist veterinarian?

A specialist veterinarian is someone who has done further postgraduate training after receiving their veterinary degree.  This normally involves a one year internship (as a general clinician working in a busy referral or emergency hospital) followed by a 3 year intensive training program (residency) in a specific area eg. ophthalmology, small animal surgery, radiology, internal medicine.

At the end of this, there are written, image recognition and practical exams that need to be passed before being eligible to enter the specialist college. In North America, this level of expertise is identified by the veterinarian becoming a Diplomate of a particular College. For example I am a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists. This is a similar pathway your own medical specialist will have taken. Once they pass their specialist exams, they are called Fellows. The main difference between them and us are the species we each have as patients.

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What is a veterinary ophthalmologist?

 A veterinary ophthalmologist is a veterinarian who has completed an intense 3 year post-graduate  training program solely focused on animal eye diseases. At the end of the residency, you are required to applied to have your training credentials accepted. Following this there are 3 days of exams; a day of written exams covering the last 7 years of the scientific literature; a day of image recognition of animal eye diseases; and a day where you are required to demonstrate surgery skills. Candidates are required to pass all sections and there is a minimum pass mark. Successful candidates are then admitted to the specialist College and become a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

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How can we find you?

We are conveniently located at 405 Maple Grove Road (Unit 14) in Cambridge. The clinic is near Highways 124, 8 and the 401 and is easily accessible from Kitchener, Waterloo, Guelph, Milton, Hamilton, London and the surrounding areas. Please click here to go to a map for directions.

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Does your clinic provide other veterinary services?

The Animal Eye Clinic of Waterloo region is a specialist eye clinic and we only provide services related to diagnosing and treating your pet's eye health. If your pet has other health problems, we recommend that you discuss these with your family veterinarian.

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How do I make an appointment?

You can contact us a number of ways;

By phone (519-564-2040), Fax (519-568-5060) or e-mail (Office@myeyevet.ca).

More information is here on the contact page.

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How do I give eye drops?

Giving eye drops to your pet can seem overwhelming at first, especially when you need to give a number of drops and give them multiple times during the day.

We have put together a short video that you can view. Before you leave the clinic we will also demonstrate how to give the drops. If you ever have questions, you can always call our clinic for help  519-654-2040.

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What type of services do you offer?

We provide medical and surgical services for animal's with eye problems. For a list of the specific services we offer please click here or go to the Our Services page.

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Does my pet have to stay overnight?

 

Does my pet have to wear the e-collar all the time?

 

How do I get more medications?

If we have prescribed medications for your pet, we will let you know at your appointment if you need to continue them. If it looks like you are going to run out, please contact us. We are able to provide more from our office or alternatively if the product we use is a human eye medicine we can call in a prescription to a human pharmacy close to you.

The law does not allow us to refill prescriptions for patients we have not seen in the last 12 months.

 

How can I find more information about my pet's eye problems?

Whilst there is a lot of easily available information on the internet, you need some discretion in trying to interpret it. We have provided a number of information pages that help explain in non-technical language about some common animal eye diseases.